Jan Neal Law Firm LLC

Alabama Estate, Elder and Special Needs Law


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Quarterly Newsletter Available

shutterstock_63936919Our quarterly newsletter, Elder Law Bookmarks, was sent today.  Articles included in the newsletter are:

  • People with Disabilities Can Now Create Their Own Special Needs Trusts
  • Is it Better to Remarry or Just Live Together?
  • Repealing Obamacare Will Have Consequences for Medicare
  • For Better or Worse, States Are Turning to Managed Care for Medicaid Long-Term-Care
  • Make Reviewing Your Estate Plan One of Your New Year’s Resolutions

If you want to be added to the mail list, send an email to neal@janneallaw.com.

 


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Beware Caregiver Expense Reimbursement

Caregiver Consoling Senior Woman

I am frequently asked if a parent can reimburse a child or other individual for expenses paid for the benefit of the parent during the spend down phase preceding application for Medicaid without running into problems with Medicaid.  In short, the answer is no unless there is evidence of a debt incurred in the form of a written agreement, promissory note, etc., for which the payment is made.  This is a harsh and difficult position for many caregivers who do not think twice of paying moving expenses, deposits, medical expenses, etc., for a parent only to find that later they cannot be reimbursed because they did not make a formal agreement.

A New York appellate court case recently confirmed this application of the Medicaid regulations by allowing a penalty to be imposed on the transfer of assets to a caregiver daughter without presenting a written agreement to evidence the debt.  Matter of Krajewski v. Zucker (N.Y. Sup. Ct., App. Div., 3rd Dept., No. 522888, Dec. 8, 2016).

In that case Jessie Krajewski lived with her daughter for two years before entering a nursing home. Ms. Krajewski’s husband withdrew money from their joint bank account to reimburse the daughter for her caregiving expenses. After Ms. Krajewski entered the nursing home, she applied for Medicaid. The state imposed a penalty period based, in part, on the transfers made to her daughter.

Ms. Krajewski appealed, arguing that because the transfers were made to reimburse her daughter for her care, the payments were not made in order to qualify for Medicaid. After a hearing, the state upheld the penalty period, and Ms. Krajewski appealed her case in court.

The N.Y. Supreme Court, Appellate Division, affirmed the agency decision, holding that Ms. Krajewski did not rebut the presumption that the transfers were made in order to qualify for Medicaid. The court found that there was no evidence of a written agreement between Ms. Krajewski and her daughter and the only evidence consisted of handwritten summaries of Ms. Krajewski’s living expenses, which was not enough to rebut the presumption.

The lesson to take from this case is that when a caregiver pays expenses for a person who will be applying for Medicaid, it is essential to have written proof of the debt before reimbursing the caregiver for those expenses.  While this is a general rule for transfer of money to a caregiver, be aware of the fact that in Alabama more requirements need to be met to reimburse a family caregiver for actual care provided.  If you want to establish such an arrangement it is important to seek legal advice first.


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Elder Law Training at OLLI

olli-materials-first-page

On October 10, 2016, Jan taught the first of a two part presentation on Elder Law at  Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at Auburn University entitled Elder Law:  Enhancing the Lives of Seniors Through Education, Planning For What Comes Next.  The second session will be taught on Monday, October 17, 2016, at 2:30 p.m. at The Clarion in Auburn, Alabama.  

Topics covered in this training include:  Older Americans Act Legal Assistance; Important Documents Needed for Proper Planning; Authority Issues; Long-term Care Levels of Care and Payment Options; Medicaid for Long-term Care; Special Needs Planning; Probate; Administration of Estates; Planning for Last Remains and Funerals.

A 39 page Keynote presentation covering these topics is provided to course participants.

Anyone interested in this and the many other learning opportunities available through OLLI can learn more by visiting the OLLI website.


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Nursing Home Residents Win Back Right to Sue

shutterstock_236328151According to ElderLaw Answers:

In recent years, nursing homes have increasingly asked — or forced — patients and their families to sign arbitration agreements prior to admission. By signing these agreements, patients or family members give up their right to sue if they believe the nursing home was responsible for injuries or the patient’s death.

Now, in an unexpected move, the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is forbidding nursing homes from entering into binding arbitration agreements with a resident or their representative before a dispute arises. The agency has issued a final rule prohibiting so-called pre-dispute arbitration agreements in facilities that accept Medicare and Medicaid patients, affecting 1.5 million nursing home residents. After a dispute arises, the resident and the long-term care facility could still voluntarily enter into a binding arbitration agreement if both parties agree.

For years, patient advocates have contended that those seeking admission to a nursing home are in no position to make a determination about giving up their right to sue. Families are focused on the quality of care, and forcing them to choose between care quality and forgoing their legal rights is unjust, the advocates said. Courts have sometimes struck down arbitration agreements as unfair, but others have upheld them.

“Clauses embedded in the fine print of nursing home admissions contracts have pushed disputes about safety and the quality of care out of public view,” the New York Times wrote in its coverage. “With its decision, [CMS] has restored a fundamental right of millions of elderly Americans across the country: their day in court.”

The nursing home industry has countered that the new rule will trigger more lawsuits that could increase costs and force some homes to close. Mark Parkinson, the president and chief executive of the American Health Care Association, said that the change “clearly exceeds” CMS’s statutory authority.

Although the rule could be challenged in court, for now it is scheduled to take effect on November 28, 2016, and will affect only future nursing home admissions. Pre-existing arbitration agreements will still be enforceable.

 


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Elder Law at OLLI

Jan is teaching a two part course on Elder Law at Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Auburn University (OLLI at Auburn).  See page 11 of the OLLI Spring 2016 catalog for the course description.  The first session is Wednesday, March 30, 2016, from 10:15 a.m. – 11:45 a.m., and the second will be on Wednesday, April 6, 2016, from 10:15 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.  Topics to be covered include Older Americans Act Legal Assistance, Authority Issues and Advance Directive Options, Long-Term Care Planning, Long-Term Care Payment Options Including Medicaid, Special Needs Planning, Probate, Administration of Estates and Funeral Planning.  If you aren’t a member of OLLI, check out all the benefits and learning opportunities here.

Materials for the training can be downloaded at elder-law-training-for-olli-at-auburn-033016-60244085 and will be posted at this site soon.


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Incentives to Purchase Long-term Care Insurance

shutterstock_305517047Long-term care insurance was originally designed to protect purchasers from the catastrophic expense associated with long-term care in a nursing home. However, over time the public has clearly voiced a preference for home care over care in an institution. In response to that preference, long-term care insurance companies now offer a variety of in-home services to help individuals pay for services to assist a person with activities of daily living. In fact most policies sold today are comprehensive policies which cover services in different long-term care settings including at home.

The majority of policies sold today are comprehensive policies. They typically cover care and services in a variety of long-term care settings to include at home skilled nursing care, occupational, speech, physical and rehabilitation therapy, and personal care. Some policies also cover homemaker services, such as meal preparation or housekeeping as well; adult day health care centers; hospice and respite; assisted living; and other residential care facilities and nursing homes.

Consumers should be aware of limitations on coverage, such as prior hospitalization requirements, and pre-existing condition exclusions. It is important to thoroughly understand what is being purchased, so a good deal of homework is involved in examining long-term care policies. Be sure that the services purchases are not services that are already covered by Medicare.

There are incentives in the form of resource protection offered by Medicaid for a person to purchase long-term care insurance.

For policies issued prior to March 1, 2009, Medicaid will not consider resources of a person equal to the amount of long-term care insurance benefit payments in determining Medicaid eligibility when the long-term care insurance policy has paid at least the first three years of nursing home care and/or home health care services.

For policies issued on or after March 1, 2009, Medicaid will not consider resources equal to the amount of benefits paid (dollar-for-dollar) by an Alabama Long-Term Care Insurance Partnership Policy (Partnership Policy) for long-term care services received in determining Medicaid eligibility and in estate recovery. The amount to be excluded will be above and beyond the standard resource exclusion provided under the Medicaid State Plan. To qualify for this exclusion, the individual must be covered by a Partnership Policy that has been certified by the Alabama Department of Insurance as a policy that covers a person who was a resident of Alabama when coverage first became effective under the policy. Medicaid will provide reciprocity with respect to long-term care insurance policies covered under other states.