Jan Neal Law Firm LLC

Alabama Elder and Special Needs Law


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Dementia Resource Publication

We have been working on a publishing project with Middle Alabama Area Agency on Aging (M4A) to produce dementia friendly resources for professionals and caregivers.  This booklet was published in June 2017 and can be read here.  To download you will need to go to the publishing platform, Issue, to create a free account or download the pdf here.  Printed copies may be obtained by contacting M4A at (205) 670-5770 or toll free (866) 570-2998.


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Resources for UNA Social Workers

Last week I spoke to the alumni social workers group at The University of North Alabama in Florence, Alabama, and shared information about authority and capacity issues for seniors.  I promised to post additional information for reference on our web site, so here you have it.

The Alabama Uniform Power of Attorney Act effective January 1, 2012, is found at Alabama Code (1975) Sections 26-1A-101 through 404.  The standard power of attorney form is found at Section 26–1A–301.  This power is presumed durable without specific language being required like previous powers of attorney.

ALA. CODE § 26-1A-120(a)(3) provides that a person may not require an additional or different form of power of attorney for authority granted in the power of attorney presented, and a person who refuses to effect a transaction in reliance upon an acknowledged power of attorney may be subject a court order mandating that the person effect the transaction.  If the document is found to be valid, attorneys fees and costs incurred may be awarded.

The Portable Physician Do Not Attempt Resuscitation Orders regulation  is found at Board of Health 420-5-19-.02.  Different facilities can continue to use their own forms, but for the order to be portable the statutory form provided in the regulation is required.

The capacity assessment materials I discussed produced by the American Bar Association and American Psychological Association can be found here.

What a great group of social workers I met, and I look forward to speaking again to the group in August.

 

 


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SSI and Gifting Resources

SSI is the basic federal safety net program for the elderly, blind and disabled, providing them with a minimum guaranteed income. If your resources are above the program’s resource limits of $2,000 for an individual or $3,000 for a married couple, you may be able to “spend down” to qualify for SSI, similar to the process to qualify for the Medicaid program.

If you give away a resource or sell it for less than it is worth in order to get under the SSI resource limit, you may be ineligible for SSI for up to 36 months. The SSA looks at whether or not you have transferred a resource within the previous three years. If you have, it computes a penalty period by dividing the amount of the transfer by your monthly benefit amount.

Thus, if you give your son a $6,000 gift and then apply for a monthly SSI benefit of $600 within three years of the gift, you will not be eligible for SSI for 10 months (6,000/600=10). That 10-month period will begin on the date of the transfer and end 10 months later. In other words, although you can be ineligible for up to 36 months due to a transfer, that is only a cap. The actual period of ineligibility is based on the value of what you transferred divided by the monthly benefit in your state.

You should be aware that transfers may be “cured” by the person to whom you made a gift returning it to you. And, finally, there are certain exceptions to the transfer penalty. These include gifts to:

A spouse (or anyone else for the spouse’s benefit);
A blind or disabled child;
A trust for the benefit of a blind or disabled child;
A trust for the sole benefit of a disabled individual under age 65 (even if the trust is for the benefit of the applicant, under certain circumstances).

In addition, special exceptions apply to the transfer of a home. The SSI applicant may freely transfer his or her home to the following individuals without incurring a transfer penalty:

The applicant’s spouse;
A child who is under age 21 or who is blind or disabled;
Into a trust for the sole benefit of a disabled individual under age 65 (even if the trust is for the benefit of the applicant, under certain circumstances);
A sibling who has lived in the home during the year preceding the applicant’s institutionalization and who already holds an equity interest in the home; or
A “caretaker child,” who is defined as a child of the applicant who lived in the house for at least two years prior to the applicant’s institutionalization and who during that period provided care that allowed the applicant to avoid a nursing home stay.


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Beware Caregiver Expense Reimbursement

Caregiver Consoling Senior Woman

I am frequently asked if a parent can reimburse a child or other individual for expenses paid for the benefit of the parent during the spend down phase preceding application for Medicaid without running into problems with Medicaid.  In short, the answer is no unless there is evidence of a debt incurred in the form of a written agreement, promissory note, etc., for which the payment is made.  This is a harsh and difficult position for many caregivers who do not think twice of paying moving expenses, deposits, medical expenses, etc., for a parent only to find that later they cannot be reimbursed because they did not make a formal agreement.

A New York appellate court case recently confirmed this application of the Medicaid regulations by allowing a penalty to be imposed on the transfer of assets to a caregiver daughter without presenting a written agreement to evidence the debt.  Matter of Krajewski v. Zucker (N.Y. Sup. Ct., App. Div., 3rd Dept., No. 522888, Dec. 8, 2016).

In that case Jessie Krajewski lived with her daughter for two years before entering a nursing home. Ms. Krajewski’s husband withdrew money from their joint bank account to reimburse the daughter for her caregiving expenses. After Ms. Krajewski entered the nursing home, she applied for Medicaid. The state imposed a penalty period based, in part, on the transfers made to her daughter.

Ms. Krajewski appealed, arguing that because the transfers were made to reimburse her daughter for her care, the payments were not made in order to qualify for Medicaid. After a hearing, the state upheld the penalty period, and Ms. Krajewski appealed her case in court.

The N.Y. Supreme Court, Appellate Division, affirmed the agency decision, holding that Ms. Krajewski did not rebut the presumption that the transfers were made in order to qualify for Medicaid. The court found that there was no evidence of a written agreement between Ms. Krajewski and her daughter and the only evidence consisted of handwritten summaries of Ms. Krajewski’s living expenses, which was not enough to rebut the presumption.

The lesson to take from this case is that when a caregiver pays expenses for a person who will be applying for Medicaid, it is essential to have written proof of the debt before reimbursing the caregiver for those expenses.  While this is a general rule for transfer of money to a caregiver, be aware of the fact that in Alabama more requirements need to be met to reimburse a family caregiver for actual care provided.  If you want to establish such an arrangement it is important to seek legal advice first.


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Elder Law Training at OLLI

olli-materials-first-page

On October 10, 2016, Jan taught the first of a two part presentation on Elder Law at  Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at Auburn University entitled Elder Law:  Enhancing the Lives of Seniors Through Education, Planning For What Comes Next.  The second session will be taught on Monday, October 17, 2016, at 2:30 p.m. at The Clarion in Auburn, Alabama.  

Topics covered in this training include:  Older Americans Act Legal Assistance; Important Documents Needed for Proper Planning; Authority Issues; Long-term Care Levels of Care and Payment Options; Medicaid for Long-term Care; Special Needs Planning; Probate; Administration of Estates; Planning for Last Remains and Funerals.

A 39 page Keynote presentation covering these topics is provided to course participants.

Anyone interested in this and the many other learning opportunities available through OLLI can learn more by visiting the OLLI website.


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Alabama ABLE Act to Provide Planning Opportunity for Disabled Persons

Husband and handicapped wife taking stroll in park alley

On June 9, 2015, Governor Bentley signed ABLE Act legislation into law in Alabama permitting the state to implement a program to permit developmentally disabled persons to have limited tax free savings without losing public benefits.  ABLE stands for Achieving a Better Life Experience, and the act was passed on the federal level in December 2014 permitting each state to set up its own program.  Though the program in Alabama has not yet become operable, it will be getting underway in the coming months.

The ABLE Act will permit up to $14,000 per year to be placed in one approved bank account set up for a developmentally disabled person living in Alabama (one who became disabled prior to age 26) with those funds exempt from counting as resources for public benefit purposes.  This means that the disabled person can have these funds to use for disability-related expenses without losing his or her public benefits such as SSI or Medicaid.  Up to $100,000 can be accumulated in an ABLE account without loss of SSI, and $350,000 can be accumulated in such an account in Alabama without loss of Medicaid (note that this is state specific, and some states may permit an accumulation as high as $425,210 or as low as $235,000 before loss of Medicaid).  At the death of the disabled person any funds left in the ABLE account will be payable to Medicaid to repay that agency in amounts up to what the agency paid for the disabled person’s health care costs.

Contributions to an ABLE account are not tax deductible, and income earned by an ABLE account is not taxable.

Stay tuned for more information about these accounts in the coming months or go to the Alabama State Treasury’s ABLE website and sign up for an update notification when accounts are available.    


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Nursing Home Residents Win Back Right to Sue

shutterstock_236328151According to ElderLaw Answers:

In recent years, nursing homes have increasingly asked — or forced — patients and their families to sign arbitration agreements prior to admission. By signing these agreements, patients or family members give up their right to sue if they believe the nursing home was responsible for injuries or the patient’s death.

Now, in an unexpected move, the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is forbidding nursing homes from entering into binding arbitration agreements with a resident or their representative before a dispute arises. The agency has issued a final rule prohibiting so-called pre-dispute arbitration agreements in facilities that accept Medicare and Medicaid patients, affecting 1.5 million nursing home residents. After a dispute arises, the resident and the long-term care facility could still voluntarily enter into a binding arbitration agreement if both parties agree.

For years, patient advocates have contended that those seeking admission to a nursing home are in no position to make a determination about giving up their right to sue. Families are focused on the quality of care, and forcing them to choose between care quality and forgoing their legal rights is unjust, the advocates said. Courts have sometimes struck down arbitration agreements as unfair, but others have upheld them.

“Clauses embedded in the fine print of nursing home admissions contracts have pushed disputes about safety and the quality of care out of public view,” the New York Times wrote in its coverage. “With its decision, [CMS] has restored a fundamental right of millions of elderly Americans across the country: their day in court.”

The nursing home industry has countered that the new rule will trigger more lawsuits that could increase costs and force some homes to close. Mark Parkinson, the president and chief executive of the American Health Care Association, said that the change “clearly exceeds” CMS’s statutory authority.

Although the rule could be challenged in court, for now it is scheduled to take effect on November 28, 2016, and will affect only future nursing home admissions. Pre-existing arbitration agreements will still be enforceable.